Breaking: Clyde Hedrick’s found Guilty

The jury has just announced their verdict and they found Clyde Hedrick’s guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the murder of Ellen Beason. This charge brings a possible minimum sentence of 2 years with a maximum sentence of 20 years. Sentencing is Monday and it should be very interesting as the state filed that document I mentioned in earlier posts allowing evidence of other crimes in. The document, known as “State’s notice of intent to use evidence of other crimes, wrongs or acts,” specifically mentions by name, two women who were killed in the 1980s. Heidi Fye and Laura Miller. Their bodies were found in a field in League City TX. Fye was found in April 1984, while Miller, whose father, Tim Miller, started Texas Equusearch “TXEQ” was found in February 1986 after disappearing in September 1984.

The state claims there is not enough evidence to charge Hedrick’s with Fye’s or Miller’s murder, but they may be able to use this information to bargain with Hedrick’s in exchange for his admission of quilt in these murders. Justice can be a dirty game that sometimes come with a price-tag, but the families of these victims deserve justice and closure, at any price.

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One thought on “Breaking: Clyde Hedrick’s found Guilty

  1. It took a year to find Ellen. Almost thirty years to bring the killer to justice. Thirty years! As your coverage of this trial indicates, much less evidence was recovered because Ellen’s remains were not found for a year. That fact coupled with the problems with the remaining evidence resulted in justice delayed for three decades!
    Law enforcement agencies nowadays often depend on search and rescue organizations to assist them in finding missing loved ones. In cases of deceased crime victims, the sooner the missing are found, the more evidence can be collected. Thus, the greater the chance of a conviction in criminal cases. Wish a search and rescue organization like TXEQ had been on the scene in 1984. Perhaps justice might have been had about 28 years sooner.

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